Did you know?

Did you know?
Commissioning Support Units (CSU) provide CCGs with support to help them within their role as commissioners. This can be in the form of financial support, HR support, or medicines management.

Did you know?
In response to the increasing financial pressure on the NHS, the 'Capped Expenditure Process' (CEP) was imposed on 14 areas of the UK which either have a track-record of over-spending NHS funding or had an unaffordable budget plan for 2017/18. The programme aims to reduce the healthcare expenditure of these particular areas.

Did you know?
Business Service Managers are often non-medical professionals who aim to streamline services by ensuring drugs and services are cost-efficient. This can be in terms of pure cost, impact on time resource, and reducing waiting lists.

Did you know?
The Care Quality Commission (CQC) is the independent regulator of health and social care in England. They publish reports rating the standard of care at health and social care services across the country. If they feel that a particular centre is inadequate, they have the power to take action against those responsible. 

Did you know?
‘Clinical leads’ are classed as both HCPs and payers for research purposes. They are HCPs in that they actually see and treat patients, but they are also classed as payers because they typically have a management responsibility over their department and will be involved in access decisions/budgeting etc… Unlike other payers, they can usually only offer a perspective for their area of speciality, so they need to be considered carefully when being included in research samples.

Did you know?
Trusts (hospitals) don’t really actually have any money. They have budgets to follow, but NHS England and CCGs actually hold the funds. So when people in hospitals talk about saving money, it’s actually budgeting rather than physical cash they save. However, sometimes the Trust will have a 'Gain share' agreement with a CCG/NHSE - so if they make a saving in the Trust, they will get a share of the actual money they saved which they can then spend on their hospital.

Did you know?
There are two types of commissioning in the NHS - local and national. Expensive, or specialist treatments (i.e. Cancer and HCV) are commissioned nationally by NHS England. Less expensive or less specialist treatments i.e. diabetes, respiratory etc. are commissioned locally by Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs). CCGs also commission 'high cost drugs' which are a group of expensive drugs, but not so rare or expensive they warrant national funding. Biologics in immunology are a good example and the CCG watches these closely to make sure they don't overspend.

Did you know?
That a Head of Medicine's Management (HMM) and a Head of Medicine's Optimisation (HMO) are the same thing? Whilst there was a drive to change the name from 'management' to 'optimisation' as it was felt this represented the broader role and bigger picture, around 70% still call themselves HMMs and state that the role is exactly the same - they are working on the bigger picture, no matter what their title.